2019 Texas Book Festival

My book Spellbound is one of the selections for the 2019 Texas Book Festival, one of the largest and prestigious literary festivals in the country. Please join me at The Contemporary Austin – Jones Center as I speak and converse about the book and my paintings on Saturday, October 26, from 12:00 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. followed by a book signing from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. I very much look forward to meeting you at the festival. If you are unable to attend the festival but wish to purchase a signed copy of Spellbound you may obtain a copy from the official festival bookseller, Bookpeople, or from the Meyer Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Spellbound is also available wherever books are sold.

The 24th annual Texas Book Festival will be held October 26-27, 2019. The Festival runs from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Sunday. The Texas Book Festival Weekend is free and open to the public and takes place in Austin, Texas, at the State Capitol and surrounding grounds. Please visit the festival website at texasbookfestival.org for more information on attending the festival, book sales and book signing, and event schedule. There are 300+ authors at the event including U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, John Grisham, Alexander McCall-Smith, Malcolm Gladwell and Pulitzer finalist Susan Choi.

Spellbound has been a labor of love of nearly two years. It is a collection of nearly 200 of my most beloved paintings from 2008-2018 along with essays on recurring themes and inspirations and my journey as an artist. It is published by the Unicorn Publishing Group from the United Kingdom.

Spellbound is the first book-length retrospective of Fatima Ronquillo, a self-taught painter who was born in the Philippines, came of age in San Antonio, and resides in Santa Fe. The Spanish and American colonial histories of these three places—and the uneasy blend of cultures that resulted there—is a subtle presence in Ronquillo’s work, where Old World techniques rub elbows with tropes drawn from Latin American magical realism. The world of Spellbound is one that marries traditional portraiture with a subversive sense of drama and playfulness. Ronquillo’s stately subjects gaze out with a regal or military bearing while angels and animals flit mischievously around the margins. Dogs wear their master’s tearful eyeballs as collar jewelry, cherubic boys clutch writhing snakes in their fists, and nuns adorn their habits with ungainly floral towers and spritely jungle monkeys.

Spellbound contains more than one hundred eighty color images of Ronquillo’s lush and deadpan oil paintings, the studies and sketches for several other works, and an introduction from noted arts writer John O’Hern.

from Unicorn Publishing

I am so honored to be a part of the festival not only as an author but as a past official artist for the 20th Anniversary of the festival in 2015.

Making Her Mark

I am honored to be participating in a group show “Making Her Mark: Art by Women” at the Meyer Gallery, Park City. Opening reception on August 30th from 6-9 pm during Park City Gallery Stroll. The show will hang until the last week of September.

My latest painting “The Peacemaker” will be on view. It is a portrait of a young woman making her mark by fighting for peace. She is crowned with the laurels of victory and poetry and in her hand are apple blossoms symbolizing renewal.

“The Peacemaker” 24×20 inches, oil on panel available at Meyer Gallery, Park City
For purchase details please click here

“Spellbound” Book Release and Solo Exhibition

Please join us tonight, Friday, May 17th from 5pm to 7pm at the Meyer Gallery in Santa Fe for an exhibition of new paintings with a book signing to celebrate the release of my debut book Spellbound. Spellbound is a retrospective of my paintings over the past decade and is published by the Unicorn Publishing Group with a lovely introduction by John O’Hern. It is available through booksellers and Amazon. Signed copies are available from the Meyer Gallery.

The exhibition “Spellbound” is a celebration of beloved pictorial themes documented in the book. The dualities of love and loss, death and rebirth, beauty and savagery fascinate me. In painting I continue to be spellbound by imagery both in the natural world around us and by the magical inner world of emotion and poetry.

“The Happy Few: Youth with Black-footed Ferrets” 16×12 inches, oil on panel
“The Overlook: Cherub with Indian Blackbuck” 40×30 inches, oil on linen
“The Betrothed” 10×8 inches, oil on panel
“Time Regained: Hand with Proust and Forget Me Nots” 8×6 inches, oil on panel
“Archangel with Nile Monitor Lizard” 52×40 inches, oil on linen
“Atalanta and the Boar” 40×32 inches, oil on linen
“Little Faun” 8×6 inches, oil on panel
“St. Lucy” 7×5 inches, oil on panel
“Hand with Ode to Martin Johnson Heade” 8×6 inches, oil on panel

“Aurora” and “The Lovebird”

Two new paintings have arrived at the Meyer Gallery in Park City, Utah.

“Aurora”
oil on panel, 7.75 x 5.75 inches

Aurora (or Eos in Greek) is the Roman goddess of dawn. I painted her appearing in fiery orange robes in a backdrop of a rosy early morning landscape. Tennyson in his poem Tithonus, describes the goddess as blinding the stars and renewing her “beauty morn by morn”. Tithonus was the lover of Aurora who was granted immortality but not eternal youth.

A soft air fans the cloud apart; there comes 
A glimpse of that dark world where I was born. 
Once more the old mysterious glimmer steals 
From thy pure brows, and from thy shoulders pure, 
And bosom beating with a heart renew’d. 
Thy cheek begins to redden thro’ the gloom, 
Thy sweet eyes brighten slowly close to mine, 
Ere yet they blind the stars, and the wild team 
Which love thee, yearning for thy yoke, arise, 
And shake the darkness from their loosen’d manes, 
And beat the twilight into flakes of fire.

from “Tithonus” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
“The Lovebird”
10×8 inches, oil on panel

“The Tempest” and “Child with Milagros”

Two new paintings are currently available: “The Tempest” at Arden Gallery in Boston and “Child with Milagros” at Meyer Gallery in Santa Fe.

The idea for “The Tempest” came from two different sources. The first is Shakespeare’s play of the same title and the second from Fiordiligi’s aria of steadfast love in Mozart’s opera “Cosí Fan Tutte”. I wanted to depict hope and strength of character in the face of adversity, symbolized by a figure confronting a gathering storm.

“The Tempest” oil on panel, 20×16 inches
available at Arden Gallery, Boston

If by your art, my dearest father, you have
Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them,
The sky, it seems would pour down the stinking pitch,
But that the sea, mounting to th’welkin’s cheek,
Dashes the fire out, O, I have suffered
With those that I saw suffer: a brave vessel―
Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her―
Dashed all to pieces, O, the cry did knock
Against my very heart, Poor souls, they perished.
Had I been any god of power, I would
Have sunk the sea within the earth, or ere
It should the good ship so have swallowed, and
The fraughting souls within her.


~ William Shakespeare “The Tempest”

Come scoglio immoto resta
Contra i venti, e la tempesta,
Così ognor quest’alma è forte
Nella fede, e nell’amor.
Con noi nacque quella face
Che ci piace, e ci consola,
E potrà la morte sola
Far che cangi affetto il cor.


~ Mozart “Così Fan Tutte”

Like a rock, we stand immobile
against the wind and storm,
and are always strong
in trust and love.
From us is born the light
that gives us pleasure and comfort,
and the power of death alone
can change the affections of our hearts.

~ (English translation by Natalie Miller)

“Child with Milagros ” oil on panel, 10×8 inches
available at Meyer Gallery, Santa Fe

“Child with Milagros” is currently on exhibit at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art in Santa Fe. It is part of the group show “GenNext: Future So Bright” featuring contemporary artists working with New Mexican imagery with historical and indigenous roots. The show runs thru March 29, 2019. The painting is available for purchase from the Meyer Gallery in Santa Fe.

Milagros are religious charms used as votive offerings at altars or shrines to aid in the healing of illnesses and wounds. They are often fashioned in the forms of body parts. In this painting, a pair of coral arms and a sacred heart are worn on a necklace.